‍“An ‍amazing ‍mash-up ‍of ‍myth ‍and ‍science… ‍presented ‍in ‍a ‍fast ‍paced ‍manner ‍with ‍the ‍scenes ‍overlapping ‍and ‍inter-cutting, ‍and ‍the ‍hard-working ‍cast ‍of ‍six ‍singers ‍and ‍two ‍dancers ‍playing ‍multiple ‍roles. ‍Lambert's ‍music ‍moved ‍between ‍the ‍popular ‍and ‍the ‍more ‍serious… ‍This ‍was ‍a ‍terrific ‍ensemble ‍show… ‍the ‍sheer ‍pell-mell ‍nature ‍of ‍the ‍piece ‍and ‍its ‍deliberate ‍car ‍crash ‍of ‍competing ‍facts ‍and ‍fantasies ‍was ‍rather ‍appealing.” ‍(Apollo’s ‍Mission ‍August ‍2019Planet ‍Hugill)


‍“…a ‍mesmerising ‍performance ‍of ‍this ‍short ‍opera… ‍had ‍the ‍audience ‍transfixed.” ‍(The ‍Parting, ‍Newbury ‍Weekly ‍News)


‍“Brave ‍and ‍baffling ‍new ‍operatic ‍worlds”. ‍“At ‍its ‍best, ‍the ‍short ‍opera ‍festival ‍offered ‍sophisticated ‍glimpses ‍of ‍the ‍future ‍of ‍the ‍genre… ‍Edward ‍Lambert’s ‍adaptation ‍and ‍setting ‍of ‍a ‍Lorca ‍play ‍in ‍the ‍Music ‍Troupe’s ‍The ‍Cloak ‍and ‍Dagger ‍Affair ‍for ‍three ‍voices ‍and ‍piano ‍was ‍more ‍musically ‍sophisticated, ‍exploiting ‍the ‍physical ‍exertions ‍demanded ‍by ‍extravagant ‍ornamentation ‍to ‍create ‍a ‍score ‍whose ‍eroticism ‍was ‍often ‍visceral.” ‍(The ‍Guardian, ‍09/08/2018)



‍“…Edward ‍Lambert’s ‍beautiful ‍melodic ‍writing, ‍with ‍some ‍particularly ‍rapturous ‍trios. ‍Inspired ‍by ‍Lorca’s ‍use ‍of ‍eighteenth ‍century ‍music ‍in ‍his ‍original, ‍Lambert ‍translates ‍the ‍play ‍into ‍a ‍bel ‍canto ‍opera, ‍including ‍three ‍lyrical ‍erotic ‍songs ‍in ‍Spanish. ‍While ‍the ‍music ‍offers ‍much ‍in ‍the ‍way ‍of ‍loveliness, ‍and ‍it’s ‍an ‍entertaining ‍listen, ‍the ‍opaqueness ‍of ‍the ‍narrative ‍leaves ‍the ‍ending ‍perplexing…” ‍(The ‍Cloak ‍and ‍Dagger ‍Affair, ‍operissimawhispers.com)


‍“More ‍traditional ‍in ‍form ‍and ‍presentation, ‍perhaps, ‍or ‍at ‍least ‍differently ‍allusive ‍to ‍opera’s ‍past, ‍Edward ‍Lambert’s ‍The ‍Cloak ‍and ‍Dagger ‍Affair, ‍based ‍upon ‍his ‍own ‍adaptation ‍from ‍Lorca’s ‍Amor ‍de ‍Don ‍Perlimplín ‍con ‍Belisa ‍en ‍su ‍jardin… ‍intriguingly ‍offered ‍elements ‍(at ‍least) ‍of ‍bel ‍canto ‍vocal ‍writing ‍to ‍vie ‍with ‍a ‍more ‍‘modern’ ‍idiom ‍in ‍his ‍piano ‍writing ‍(and ‍playing), ‍showing ‍us, ‍not ‍unlike ‍Stravinsky, ‍that ‍the ‍smallest ‍changes ‍can ‍sometimes ‍have ‍one ‍listen ‍in ‍a ‍very ‍different ‍way ‍indeed. ‍Pulcinella ‍perhaps ‍inevitably ‍came ‍to ‍mind ‍as ‍this ‍re-imagination ‍of ‍a ‍re-imagination ‍of ‍the ‍commedia ‍dell’arte ‍worked ‍not ‍inconsiderable ‍magic. ‍Excellent ‍performances, ‍once ‍again, ‍from ‍all ‍concerned.” ‍

‍(boulezian.blogspot.com)



‍✩✩✩✩ ‍“Packing ‍all ‍the ‍punches ‍- ‍As ‍a ‍feminist ‍call ‍to ‍arms, ‍The ‍Art ‍of ‍Venus ‍may ‍chill ‍the ‍stomachs ‍of ‍an ‍audience ‍with ‍its ‍visceral ‍punch, ‍but ‍it’s ‍undeniably ‍timely ‍and ‍relevant. ‍Edward ‍Lambert’s ‍score ‍felt ‍sumptuously ‍melodic, ‍as ‍well ‍as ‍busily ‍fresh, ‍with ‍strong, ‍intensely ‍written ‍passages ‍building ‍to ‍moments ‍of ‍euphoric ‍surprise. ‍I ‍walked ‍out ‍feeling ‍as ‍though ‍my ‍head ‍had ‍just ‍been ‍dipped ‍in ‍an ‍ice-cold ‍bucket ‍of ‍gin ‍and ‍tonic: ‍shaken, ‍astonished, ‍and ‍utterly ‍exhilarated.”  (The ‍Art ‍of ‍Venus, ‍operissimawhispers.com)



‍“Bite-sized ‍operas ‍go ‍down ‍a ‍treat ‍- ‍The ‍music ‍itself ‍is ‍a ‍riveting ‍kaleidoscope ‍of ‍different ‍textures ‍and ‍colours… ‍Such ‍was ‍the ‍span ‍of ‍the ‍narrative ‍that ‍most ‍of ‍us ‍hardly ‍breathed ‍for ‍the ‍duration.”  (The ‍Oval ‍Portrait, ‍Newbury ‍Weekly ‍News)


‍“...the ‍delivery ‍(was) ‍compellingly ‍urgent. ‍The ‍Book’s ‍polyphonic ‍opening ‍- ‍rather ‍like ‍a ‍Renaissance ‍motet ‍- ‍was ‍controlled ‍and ‍the ‍entries ‍clear. ‍The ‍homophonic ‍repetitions ‍emphasising ‍the ‍painter’s ‍neglect ‍of ‍his ‍young ‍bride ‍as ‍she ‍sat ‍in ‍the ‍dark ‍turret ‍for ‍many ‍weeks ‍while ‍his ‍gaze ‍was ‍fixed ‍on ‍his ‍easel ‍- ‍he ‍did ‍not ‍see ‍that ‍“the ‍light ‍in ‍that ‍lone ‍turret/ ‍Withered ‍the ‍health ‍and ‍spirits ‍of ‍his ‍bride ‍who ‍pined ‍visibly ‍to ‍all ‍but ‍him.” ‍- ‍became ‍increasingly ‍disturbing, ‍and ‍confirmed ‍Lambert’s ‍effective ‍text-setting.” ‍(The ‍Oval ‍Portrait, ‍Opera ‍Today)



‍✩✩✩✩ ‍"Bite ‍sized ‍opera ‍strikes ‍gold ‍- ‍An ‍impressive ‍debut ‍with ‍all ‍the ‍ingredients ‍of ‍a ‍full ‍length ‍opera, ‍arias, ‍love ‍scene, ‍ensembles ‍and ‍a ‍final ‍tragedy ‍all ‍played ‍out ‍in ‍just ‍55 ‍minutes. ‍This ‍rich ‍mix ‍of ‍interlocking ‍characters ‍quietly ‍bring ‍their ‍theatrical ‍performances ‍to ‍an ‍intense ‍climax ‍of ‍pain ‍and ‍despair. ‍There ‍is ‍much ‍to ‍commend ‍this ‍lively ‍production…”   (Six ‍Characters, ‍remotegoat.com)


‍"fabulous ‍piece ‍of ‍theatre... ‍great ‍entertainment, ‍thought-provoking ‍and ‍not ‍too ‍long, ‍presented ‍to ‍a ‍very ‍high ‍standard." ‍

‍(Six ‍Characters, ‍Newbury ‍Weekly ‍News)


‍✩✩✩✩✩ ‍"...fast ‍pace, ‍stylish ‍production...and ‍Lambert's ‍strikingly ‍lively ‍score"  (Six ‍Characters, ‍Planet ‍Hugill)


‍"...a ‍rather ‍quirky ‍and ‍entertaining ‍piece ‍which ‍had ‍a ‍very ‍real ‍point ‍to ‍make. ‍Lambert's ‍music ‍is ‍tonal ‍but ‍complex, ‍there ‍are ‍tunes ‍but ‍the ‍music ‍never ‍talked ‍down ‍to ‍you. ‍His ‍vocal ‍lines ‍sounded ‍interesting ‍but ‍singable. ‍There ‍was ‍something ‍of ‍process ‍music ‍about ‍his ‍instrumental ‍writing, ‍he ‍liked ‍setting ‍up ‍figures ‍and ‍letting ‍them ‍run, ‍but ‍he ‍managed ‍to ‍get ‍some ‍remarkably ‍fascinating ‍and ‍complex ‍textures ‍from ‍his ‍quite ‍minimal ‍forces. ‍Performances ‍were ‍admirable, ‍and ‍all ‍the ‍singers ‍had ‍great ‍charm ‍and ‍stage ‍presence, ‍bringing ‍off ‍their ‍various ‍roles ‍and ‍creating ‍a ‍quirkily ‍entertaining ‍ensemble, ‍but ‍one ‍with ‍a ‍point."  (Catfish ‍Conundrum, ‍Planet ‍Hugill)


‍“Congrats ‍on ‍'The ‍Catfish ‍Conundrum'. ‍Brilliantly ‍bonkers, ‍thought-provoking ‍satire. ‍A ‍Festival ‍highlight ‍for ‍me.” ‍

‍(@lovearhyme ‍at ‍Tête ‍à ‍Tiete ‍Festival, ‍10/08/2014)


‍“There ‍is ‍a ‍sublime ‍moment ‍when ‍the ‍catfish ‍sings ‍a ‍prayer ‍– ‍‘Sanctus’ ‍– ‍while ‍resigning ‍herself ‍to ‍her ‍fate, ‍her ‍pretty ‍voice ‍barely ‍a ‍whisper ‍over ‍the ‍strings’ ‍rippling ‍accompaniment.”  (The ‍Catfish ‍Conundrum, ‍Francesca ‍Wickers, ‍Fringe ‍Opera)





‍“Came ‍to ‍your ‍opera ‍the ‍other ‍night ‍- ‍by ‍the ‍way ‍was ‍really ‍cool ‍! ‍Having ‍never ‍been ‍to ‍an ‍opera ‍before… ‍this ‍was ‍completely ‍different ‍to ‍how ‍I ‍expected ‍- ‍even ‍down ‍to ‍the ‍singing ‍style… ‍I ‍enjoyed ‍it ‍a ‍lot ‍because ‍of ‍this. ‍The ‍way ‍I ‍look ‍at ‍opera ‍has ‍definitely ‍been ‍altered. ‍I ‍would ‍approach ‍other ‍pieces ‍with ‍an ‍open ‍mind ‍and ‍a ‍view ‍that ‍opera ‍is ‍in ‍fact ‍a ‍flourishing ‍and ‍contemporary ‍art ‍form.” ‍

‍(Josh, ‍student, ‍at ‍Opera ‍With ‍A ‍Title, ‍2015)